Upload vrs Embed

This afternoon in class we learned more about two words that we use when we are blogging or working on the internet.

Upload

When you move a copy of a file (image, doc, pdf, audio, video, presentation etc) from your laptop/computer to the internet.  Uploading means that you will be “storing” that file somewhere on the internet – it will take up space somewhere.

We upload our class images to the G3 Room 207 collection on the school flickr account – these images are a copy and are “stored” on the website Flickr.
(Our school pays for a pro account so that we can have unlimited images stored in this account).

Embed

 

When you display a file (image, doc, video, presentation)  on your website (like your blog) that is ALREADY stored on the internet somewhere.

 

html code is required to “embed” something in a website like our blogs.  We have already learned about html codes for embedding a widget on the sidebar of our blog.

This means that we embed our prezis and voicethreads (we don’t upload them) because they are already stored on the internet somewhere.  Our Prezis are in our Class Prezi account, our VoiceThreads are in our own VoiceThread accounts and our Google Presentations are stored in our Google Accounts.

Tape library, CERN, Geneva It is much better for us to embed things in our blog rather than upload.  When we upload to our blog, the file we have uploaded will take up storage space on our blog.  We don’t have a lot of storage space available on our blog so we store our files in other places on the internet whenever we can.

We usually store our videos in our Class YouTube account.  We store our photos/images in our school flickr account.  We store our documents in our Google Account as much as we can.

Photo Credit: gruntzooki via Compfight cc

Safe Search Engines

Over the next few weeks we will be Reading to Become Experts!  During this time we may be using books and internet sources to read and learn about certain topics that we would like to become more expert in.

We need to understand a little more about how search engines work. View the video below from the very good Common Craft Plain English series on Web Search – Strategies in Plain English

Today we looked again at Boolify – a safe search engine for kids.  We will continue using this search engine in class and at home as well as a few others.  You can always find the links to these safe search engines on our right hand sidebar of our class blog.

Boolify
Boolify helps students bridge that gap by visualizing the process and letting students interact with the abstract concept behind the search process in a tangible and hands-on way.

Check out this 1:25m video on how to get started with Boolify

SquirrelNet
SquirrelNet is a kids only search engine that has Google SafeSearch activated. From the homepage itself, you can also access the Google directory of websites relevant for children.

Dib Dab Doo & Dilly Too!
The search engine is again based on Google Custom Search and it tries to keep the content as children friendly as possible.

Kids Click!
A web search site designed for kids by librarians – with kid-friendly results!

 

Search Engines for Kids
– and what they search –

No Search Engine is entirely 100% safe. Custom search helps to keep out a lot of unsavory links, but it is definitely not foolproof. Most of the search engines for kids also display ads with some undesirable ones sneaking in. Parental control software in combination with these search engines can help to keep children shielded from the bad side of the web. It is a tough battle but at least with these sites, parents and teachers can worry a little less.

As with any use of technology, each time we use our laptops in class we will always include strategies for what to do when the “undesirables” sneak in.

Information also adapted from: Make Use Of: 10 Search Engines for Kids with Safe Browsing

Search Engines for Kids

Before we even get started with Search Engines, we need to understand a little more about how search engines work. View the video below from the very good Common Craft Plain English series on Web Search – Strategies in Plain English

SquirrelNet
SquirrelNet is a kids only search engine that has Google SafeSearch activated. From the homepage itself, you can also access the Google directory of websites relevant for children.

Dib Dab Doo & Dilly Too!
The search engine is again based on Google Custom Search and it tries to keep the content as children friendly as possible.

Kids Click!
A web search site designed for kids by librarians – with kid-friendly results!

Boolify
Librarians, teachers and parents have told us how hard it is for students to understand web searching. Boolify helps students bridge that gap by visualizing the process and letting students interact with the abstract concept behind the search process in a tangible and hands-on way.

Check out this 1:25m video on how to get started with Boolify

 

Search Engines for Kids
– and what they search –

No Search Engine is entirely 100% safe. Custom search helps to keep out a lot of unsavory links, but it is definitely not foolproof. Most of the search engines for kids also display ads with some undesirable ones sneaking in. Parental control software in combination with these search engines can help to keep children shielded from the bad side of the web. It is a tough battle but at least with these sites, parents and teachers can worry a little less.

As with any use of technology, the lesson will always include strategies for what to do when the “undesirables” sneak in.

Information also adapted from: Make Use Of: 10 Search Engines for Kids with Safe Browsing

Help! My Meta Widget Disappeared!

A lot of students have been changing their theme this year only to discover that the meta widget (the little widget that helps you log in) has “disappeared!”  Well the good news is, it hasn’t actually disappeared and there is a way to get it back.

First, you need to know:
Each theme comes with it’s default widgets – that means all themes start off with certain widgets automatically when you switch to a different theme.  Sometimes the default widgets do NOT include a meta widget.

If your meta widget has “disappeared”:

  • Type the url of your blog into the address bar:  (I’ll use my URL as an example) http://blogs.isb.ac.th/chrissyh
  • Add /wp-admin to the end of the url so it now looks like this:
    http://blogs.isb.ac.th/chrissyh/wp-admin
  • Click enter/return

You should now be able to log into the backend of your blog.

  • Go to Appearance, then widgets
  • Find the Meta widget and drag it back onto the sidebar
  • Remember to click save

You should be able to see the Meta widget on the frontend of your blog again!  See? I told it was easy!

 

Leaving a Comment on Someone’s Blog

We are learning how to be better commentors on blogs.  Here are some thoughts from our class discussion.

  • Refer to the facts of the post: Comment on the things that are interesting and new to you
  • Make Connections: Relate and compare things you are reading in the post to things that you already know.
  • Ask Questions: What about the content of the post is confusing to you? What don’t you understand? Remember that there will ALWAYS be questions in an active thinker’s mind!
  • Give Your Opinions: Make judgments about what you are reading. Do you agree? Do you disagree? Like? Dislike? Do you support or oppose anything that you have read? Why?

You could use the following sentence starters below to help you begin your comment

This reminds me of…
This is similar to…
I wonder…
I realized…
I noticed…
You can relate this to…
I’d like to know…
I’m surprised that…
If I were ________, I would ______________
If __________ then ___________
Although it seems…
I’m not sure that…

Adapted from: Bill Ferriter’s Digitally Speaking